Peecho: The Internet's Print Button

PeechoGrab-Post.jpg

A cloud-based printing start-up with headquarters in Amsterdam, Peecho has flown under the radar since it opened shop last year. But founders Martijn Groot and Sander Nagtegaal hope to change that with a new service they're calling the Internet's Print Button. Printcloud, a system that operates completely on Amazon's Web Services, allows developers and webmasters to embed a simple button similar to Facebook's "Like" button or Twitter's "Tweet" button to any page or post.

The button is only a few lines of code, but it's powerful. Once it's been added to a site, visitors can click the button and tap into Peecho's global network of professional printers, all set up with the company's proprietary software. The Internet's Print Button calls up a window that allows visitors to enter their billing information and shipping address and have content from the web delivered to their door in the form of a book or magazine. Going forward, users will also be able to print on postcards, t-shirts and more.

Webmasters and editors can assign their own prices to any product, offering customers content at Peecho's minimum amount or skimming a few bucks off the top. The websites that choose to work with Peecho are also responsible for providing customer support and managing their own database of billing and shipping information. 

For now, the Peecho button only supports content in PDF form, but the developers behind the new service insist that support for other types of content is forthcoming. An open API also allows developers to work Peecho and its printing functionality into their own apps and services.

Image: Peecho.

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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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