How Much Electricity Does Indoor-Grown Pot Use?

Ariel Schwartz of Fast Company dug up some fun energy facts about indoor-grown marijuana. Namely, a new study by Lawrence Berkeley Lab's Evan Mills found that the pot that goes into a single joint requires 1,700 watt-hours of electricity. That's like taking a common 60-watt light bulb and leaving it on for more than a day.

The sobering news comes from a report by Evan Mills, a longtime energy analyst at Lawrence Berkeley National Labs who, uh, has a friend who told him about all this weed stuff. According to Mills, the problem can be traced back to the high-intensity lighting, dehumidification, air-conditioning, irrigation systems, space-heating, and ventilation systems that all go into making sure marijuana plants grow up to be healthy, smokeable adults. And since the industry operates in the shadows, it hasn't felt the consumer pressure to go green (rimshot!).

Read the full story at Fast Company.

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