Facebook's Newest Scam: Photoshop App With Fake Photos

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As of early Monday morning, more than 600,000 people had already fallen prey to the newest Facebook scam, which is rapidly spreading across the network at the time of this writing. On their Facebook Chat window, users are receiving messages from friends that read, "hey, i just made a photoshop of you." The message includes a link to a third-party application that asks for access to your profile, access you've likely granted to dozens of outside apps in the past. Once you've fallen for the trick, the app distracts you with pictures of animals with human-like faces as it quickly goes to work spamming your Facebook friends via Chat.

We've covered lots of different Facebook scams on these digital pages before. The social network, which has more than 600 million active users and continues to grow at lightning speed as it focuses its marketing efforts in populous places outside of our borders, has become a go-to for scammers looking to make a quick buck. While most seem obvious and easy to ignore or avoid, it only takes a few clicks to get these viral scams moving.

"This scam is spreading rapidly," according to M86 Security Labs, which has been monitoring the scam all morning. "Over 88,000 clicks per hour."

If you've fallen for it -- those animal/human hybrid photos are pretty funny! -- the best thing you can do at this point is to go into your Privacy Settings and remove the application's access to your profile information. (Instructions on how to do that, and more, are available here.) "At this point, we do not know what the end game is for the scammers here," M86 reported. "The destination site results in no malicious infection and does not lead to a survey scam." Once you remove access, you should be safe to continue browsing Facebook.

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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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