Export Your Google Reader Feeds to a New Email Account

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Q: I've created a great Google Reader account with hundreds of RSS feeds organized into categories. But it's trapped, tied to one email address. I'd like to transfer it over to another account. Is that possible or must I abandon it?

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A: Never fear. You can copy your Google Reader over to a different G-mail account --  it's a simple export/import task. First, you have to export your subscription as an Outline Processor Markup Language (OPLM) file. You might ask, What, exactly, is an 'OPLM file' -- that sounds complicated. All you need to understand is that it's a type of file (XLM) that stores feeds.

First, you must export your desired Reader. Under your Google Reader settings, you'll find the import/export tab. There, you can copy the feeds by clicking the 'Export your subscriptions as an OPLM file' link. That downloads the entire set of feeds as a single XLM file to your computer.

Once you've downloaded the file, head over to the email account to which you'd like to send your Reader. Again, go to your settings and navigate to the import/export tab. This time, you want to import that OPLM file you just downloaded. It asks you to choose the file, which you have to find on your computer -- this is the only somewhat tricky part of the exchange because you have to search through your computer for the download. When you downloaded it earlier it should have saved as an XLM file named 'google-reader-subscription' saved under 'Downloads.' If you can't find it there, do a search on your computer for the file.

After you've uploaded it, click import and voila: your subscriptions should appear in the new Reader. If you already had some feeds lined up in that Reader, the imported list will appear below those feeds. If not, it should look identical to the original list.

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Image: indiekid/Flickr.

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Rebecca Greenfield is a writer based in Brooklyn. She was formerly on staff at The Atlantic Wire.

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