Next Target for Hackers: Your Car

Finally, I've got a good reason to get that '68 Karmann Ghia instead of a fancy new, tech-heavy automobile. Technology Review reports on new tests by researchers in which they were able to hack into and control cars sing GM's OnStar and Ford's Sync systems.

The researchers were able to control everything from the car's brakes to its door locks to its computerized dashboard displays by accessing the onboard computer through GM's OnStar and Ford's Sync, as well as through the Bluetooth connections intended for making hands-free phone calls. They presented their findings this week to the National Academies Committee on Electronic Vehicle Controls and Unintended Acceleration, which was brought together partly in response to last year's scandal over supposed problems with the computerized braking systems in Toyota Priuses.

Read the full story at Technology Review.

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