Picture of the Day: Capturing a Full Day in a Single Photograph

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On December 30, 2010, amateur astrophotographer Chris Kotsiopoulos set out to capture an entire day in a single photograph. After several days of preparation and nearly 30 hours alone in a stationary position, Kotsiopoulos produced this incredible image:

The 'day part' is composed of a dozen of shots covering the landscape from east to west and the Sun's course from sunrise to sunset. The Sun's position was recorded exactly every 15 minutes using an intervalometer, with an astrosolar filter adjusted to the camera lens. In one of the shots, when the Sun was near it's maximum altitude, I removed the filter in order to capture a more 'dramatic' shot with the Sun's glare. After the sunset, I took various shots with the camera facing west - northwest in order to achieve a more smooth transition from the 'day part' to the 'night part' of the picture. The 'night part' is also composed of a dozen of shots covering the landscape from west to east. After the 'transition' shots I mentioned above, I took a small startrail sequence, with approximately half an hour duration, and the camera facing northwest. Then at 19.13 local time, I turned the camera to north and I started taking the all-night startrail which lasted almost 11 hours. After the 11 hour startrail I turned the camera to northeast and I shot a half an hour startrail, and finally with the camera at northeast and east some 'night to day' transition shots.

Read Kotsiopoulos' entire explanation at Greeksky.

View more Pictures of the Day.

Via Today and Tomorrow.

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Jared Keller is a former associate editor for The Atlantic and The Atlantic Wire and has also written for Lapham's Quarterly's Deja Vu blog, National Journal's The Hotline, Boston's Weekly Dig, and Preservation magazine. 

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