Hackers Break Into Mubarak Ruling Party Website

In celebration of Hosni Mubarak's resignation after 30 years of uninterrupted rule, hackers have broken into the website of the National Democratic Party (NDP), the Egyptian ruling party. Established by President Anwar El Sadat in 1978, the NDP dominated Egyptian political life under Mubarak; their headquarters was set on fire by anti-government protesters on January 28 as Egyptians took to the streets. The NDP website now looks like this:

ndp website.png

This message roughly (i.e. via Google Chrome's translation widget) reads:

Be safe, Egypt!

Preserve our nation, our beloved Egypt, from all enemies of evils. I love you Egypt!

If anyone can provide a clearer translation, please post it in the comments section and I'll update this post accordingly.

Update, 3:40 p.m.: Translation updated. Thanks to Miriem Kastally via The Atlantic Tumblr.

H/T Ian Miles Cheong.

Presented by

Jared Keller is a former associate editor for The Atlantic and The Atlantic Wire and has also written for Lapham's Quarterly's Deja Vu blog, National Journal's The Hotline, Boston's Weekly Dig, and Preservation magazine. 

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