Don't Like Content Farms? Help Google Block Them

All you unpaid journalists and guardians of content quality can finally take revenge on the content arms clogging up your search results. Google released an extension for the Chrome browser that lets you blacklist sites from your searches -- and that sends that data back to Google. Presumably when a site reaches a certain threshold, its PageRank would drop, hurting its chances of showing up high in search results. GigaOm says it's a case of Google putting the onus on users to differentiate the real from the almost spam:

Google seems to be further acknowledging that it's got an issue here. The company previously said it's working on dealing with content farms. But now, it's empowering people to actually single out sites and block them. It's a quick and dirty way to address the problem by shifting the burden on to users instead of Google taking more of an active approach. It may be that Google is looking for better guidance on what people think a low-quality content farm. One person's how-to video is another person's spam.

Read the full story at GigaOm.

Presented by

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her middle school. Then Humans of New York told her story to the Internet—and everything changed.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

Video

What Fifty Shades Left Out

A straightforward guide to BDSM

More in Technology

Just In