Maybe the Phrase 'On the Air' No Longer Makes Sense

Susan Orlean tucks a brilliant little bit of technological criticism into her piece on watching the State of the Union address while tweeting.

I've missed that kind of television togetherness, which has largely vanished in the era of DVRs and video on demand; even if you're watching something that a friend is watching, too, there's a very good chance you've time-shifted it to whatever's convenient rather than when it was on the air. That makes me think we ought to change the expression "on the air" to "in the air," since so much of what comes through our televisions these days is hovering rather than streaming, just hanging there until we beckon it, rather than it commanding us to come to the living room and take a seat.

Read the full story at the New Yorker.

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