Jay Rosen on Wikipedia's 10th Anniversary

More

People who study online life are familiar with the One Percent Rule. It says that if 100 people gather at a given site, about 10 percent will contribute anything at all, even a comment at a blog post, and less than one percent will become deeply engaged as a regular contributor. The rest will just use the service. There are two ways to come at that finding. One is to sneer at utopian projections like "everyone's an author now." And the One Percent Rule does, in fact, crash those illusions. It's a double espresso of digital realism. Wakes you up fast.

bug_wikipedia.jpgA different way to think about it is to do a little math. Today, nytimes.com draws in the neighborhood of 18 million unique visitors per month. They tend to be educated, informed, curious about the world. According to the One Percent Rule, about 180,000 of them would become serious contributors -- if given a proper chance. As the Times tries to make its way in the new economy of news, it has no choice but to think about how to tap into that massive group, which is many times larger than the entire American press corps.

Think of it this way: If the number one asset the Times has is its brand and reputation, and number two is the talent and experience of its professional staff, the third most important asset is, in fact, the knowledge and sophistication of its users and especially the 180,000, the one percent.  But how to get some of that knowledge flowing in, so as to make from it high quality editorial goods for the remaining 99 percent? This is a strategic puzzle for the New York Times. I believe they're aware of it. Now in that puzzle, the single best place to turn for how something like that can be done is Wikipedia, which still calls itself "the free encyclopedia that anyone can edit."

"Anyone can" doesn't mean "everyone will." Almost everyone won't. But even then something great and powerful can be built. That's what Wikpedia teaches us about organizing people online.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Jay Rosen is a press critic, a writer, and a professor of journalism at New York University. He writes frequently about issues in journalism and developments in the media at PressThink.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

The Time JFK Called the Air Force to Complain About a 'Silly Bastard'

51 years ago, President John F. Kennedy made a very angry phone call.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.

Video

What Makes a Story Great?

The storytellers behind House of CardsandThis American Life reflect on the creative process.

Video

Tracing Sriracha's Origin to Thailand

Ever wonder how the wildly popular hot sauce got its name? It all started in Si Racha.

Video

Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in Technology

Just In