Good Infrastructure News at Last

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Whatever else may be falling apart, one of the America's most historic (if little-known) structures is still going strong after a major renewal, the Newark Star-Ledger reports. And the original cables are still doing their job after over a century of the automotive age and northwest New Jersey weather:

The bridge, which crosses to Pennsylvania near the Warren-Hunterdon county border, hearkens to the year when Teddy Roosevelt was president, Cary Grant was born and the Trans-Siberian railway was completed. Bridge historians herald it as one of the few, if not only, remaining American multi-span highway bridges with continuous cables.

Unlike the typical suspension bridge that contains two suspension towers, the Riegelsville Bridge has four. And you can't miss the signature Roebling bridge cables -- still holding the bridge together more than a century later -- or the ornate touches.

Congratulations to the Roebling descendants, to the enlightened Delaware River Toll Bridge Commission, to the construction team, and to the Star-Ledger for prominent coverage in print and great additional photography by Tony Kurdzuk online. It's a wonderful feeling to see such a classic renewed.

Image: Riegelsville suspension bridge seen from Pennsylvania side, Wikimedia Commons.

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Edward Tenner is a historian of technology and culture. He was a founding advisor of Smithsonian's Lemelson Center and holds a Ph.D in European history. More

Edward Tenner is an independent writer and speaker on the history of technology and the unintended consequences of innovation. He holds a Ph.D. in European history from the University of Chicago and was executive editor for physical science and history at Princeton University Press. A former member of the Harvard Society of Fellows and John Simon Guggenheim fellow, he has been a visiting lecturer at Princeton and has held visiting research positions at the Institute for Advanced Study, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and the Princeton Center for Information Technology Policy. He is now an affiliate of the Center for Arts and Cultural Policy of Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School. He was a founding advisor of Smithsonian's Lemelson Center, where he remains a senior research associate.

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