Amid Demonstrations, Twitter Blocked in Egypt

Amira Al Hussaini reports for Global Voices that Twitter has been blocked in Egypt, apparently in an attempt to disrupt political activity. From tweets Al Hussaini curated, it appears that the communications blockade may be broader than just the microblogging service as the Mubarak regime endeavors to quell dissidents.

Such censorship has sparked the anger of activists, especially since it is the first time in Egypt's history that such heavy-handedness is used to silence people online. The move is a stark reminder of the iron fist with which ousted Tunisian strongman Zeine El Abidine Ben Ali clamped down on the Internet, in neighbouring Tunisia, whose uprising has inspired millions of Arabs.

For more updates, keep an eye on Global Voices, which does a fantastic job of covering the nexus of tech and politics internationally. You can also follow the #jan25 hashtag on Twitter through this handy translator that the Washington Post has up.

Presented by

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A Stop-Motion Tour of New York City

A filmmaker animated hundreds of still photographs to create this Big Apple flip book

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open for 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

Video

What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

Science cannot fully explain near-death experiences.

More in Technology

Just In