Navy Pilots Damage Helicopters Trying to Capture Facebook Photo

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A helicopter -- especially a Navy helicopter -- can do some pretty incredible things, but double as a boat is not one of them. Two Navy pilots found that out the hard way this past September when their machines landed in Lake Tahoe and sustained half a million dollars in damages to the electronic antenna and other flight equipment.

The pilots were hovering over Lake Tahoe just so that they could capture a cool Facebook profile picture, an official investigation revealed. "The investigation identified the decision of the aircraft commanders to conduct hovers over Lake Tahoe without completing the necessary engine performance calculations as the causal factor for the mishap," according to the Navy's press release concerning the incident.

The two unidentified pilots have been stripped of their flying status and forced to repeat training.

Via Switched.

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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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