Google Unveils iPad-Sized Android Tablet

Speaking at the D: Get Into Mobile conference in San Francisco, Google Mobile Platform VP Andy Rubin showed off Google's brand new Android "Honeycomb" tablet. While the presentation wasn't a thorough demonstration of the Honeycomb's full functionality, Rubin certainly teased the audience with the new gadget: 


The roughly 10-inch, Motorola device was sleek, black, thin and sported an Android interface unlike any we've seen before. There was a very clean homepage, but the app page looked almost Apple iPad-like. Plus, when Rubin brought up the Gmail app, it looked almost exactly like Gmail on the iPad. 

Rubin didn't offer my many spec details on the tablet, which he joked would cost $10,000, but he did say it was running an NVidia dual core CPU (presumably a Tegra).

 Mostly, Rubin showed off an upcoming version of Google Maps for Android (which should release "within days"). It adds a new vector-based map drawing system which appeared to improve speed and map flexibility. As Rubin manipulated the map with his fingers, it changed from a flat map to a three-dimensional outline of the roads and buildings.

While Apple certainly dominated the smartphone boom with the original iPhone, Android has quickly risen as a fierce competitor. One can only wonder if the cycle will repeat itself in the tablet market.

Read the whole story at PC Magazine.
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Jared Keller is a former associate editor for The Atlantic and The Atlantic Wire and has also written for Lapham's Quarterly's Deja Vu blog, National Journal's The Hotline, Boston's Weekly Dig, and Preservation magazine. 

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