5 Months on Tumblr as Seen Through Pummelvision

Pummelvision is a new tool that takes photographs you have uploaded to your Tumblr, Facebook or Flickr accounts and turns them into a rapid slideshow of your (digital) life. The Atlantic's Tumblr launched in August of this year and, when plugged into the Pummelvision interface, already shows more than 230 images for the service to choose from.

Amanda Mooney, a social media strategist for Edelman, recently posted a Pummelvision video of her two years on Tumblr to the blog for Ruby Pseudo, a London-based agency. In her post, Mooney noted that Pummelvision reminds her of Rick Webb's summary of Tumblr: It's "the only place you can talk serious business mixed in with badass shark photos."

As you watch our video, you'll see that this holds true for The Atlantic's account. Over the past five months, Jared Keller, our social media editor, has uploaded dozens of great stories from our 153-year archive; highlighted debates on topics political and cultural from our digital pages on TheAtlantic.com; and recognized, at the same time, less serious Internet ephemera. Today alone, his posts range from pixelated Senate members to a story on the Union Army Balloon Corp, a team that surveilled Confederate troops during the Civil War using air-filled balloons.

Presented by

Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Confessions of Moms Around the World

A global look at the hardest and best job ever

Video

A Stop-Motion Tour of New York City

A filmmaker animated hundreds of still photographs to create this Big Apple flip book

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open for 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

More in Technology

Just In