5 Months on Tumblr as Seen Through Pummelvision

Pummelvision is a new tool that takes photographs you have uploaded to your Tumblr, Facebook or Flickr accounts and turns them into a rapid slideshow of your (digital) life. The Atlantic's Tumblr launched in August of this year and, when plugged into the Pummelvision interface, already shows more than 230 images for the service to choose from.

Amanda Mooney, a social media strategist for Edelman, recently posted a Pummelvision video of her two years on Tumblr to the blog for Ruby Pseudo, a London-based agency. In her post, Mooney noted that Pummelvision reminds her of Rick Webb's summary of Tumblr: It's "the only place you can talk serious business mixed in with badass shark photos."

As you watch our video, you'll see that this holds true for The Atlantic's account. Over the past five months, Jared Keller, our social media editor, has uploaded dozens of great stories from our 153-year archive; highlighted debates on topics political and cultural from our digital pages on TheAtlantic.com; and recognized, at the same time, less serious Internet ephemera. Today alone, his posts range from pixelated Senate members to a story on the Union Army Balloon Corp, a team that surveilled Confederate troops during the Civil War using air-filled balloons.

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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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