1 in 5 Americans Will Own a Tablet by 2014

A new study commissioned by Fuze Box and Harris Interactive predicts that 20 percent of Americans will own at least one tablet computer -- most likely an Apple iPad -- by 2014. Men will be more likely than women to own one, younger people more likely than older people. Ina Fried at All Things Digital wonders if 20 percent market saturation will be enough to keep all of the current -- and future -- tablet makers in business.

While that's a significant number to be sure, I'm beginning to wonder if even that figure will be large enough to support all the players entering the tablet fray.

There are the incumbents like the iPad and Samsung's Galaxy Tab. Motorola is gearing up to launch a Honeycomb-based Android tablet at CES. HP has said it is working on a Palm Tablet, while RIM is readying its PlayBook for release around March.

And that's just the big guys. Expect to hear a lot of smaller firms enter the tablet fray as well, including many at CES. Education-centered tablet maker Kno-which announced its product at last year's D conference-has started shipping its large dual-screen and single-screen models, while Notion Ink has been further teasing its Adam tablet.

Plus, Microsoft, which has been on the outside looking in at the early slate growth, hopes to get back into the game next year as well.

Even with a big market, that leaves a lot of companies angling for a piece of the pie.

Read the full story at All Things Digital.

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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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