Send a Kindle Book to Anyone With an Email Address

Gifting any of the 725,000 books available in the Kindle store is now as easy as entering an email address, according to a press release put out by Amazon this morning. The recipient doesn't even need to own a Kindle. When you're doing your holiday shopping this year, it might be easier to avoid the lines, stay home and pull together all of your contacts. And here, a helpful guide for moving the email addresses of all of your Facebook friends into your address book. (For the record, my address is njackson@theatlantic.com and I'm especially fond of literary nonfiction.)

Of course, those without a Kindle can read their e-books on the Kindle App for the iPad, iPhone, BlackBerry and Android devices. Gifters can choose a book in the Kindle Store, and send give the e-book as a gift by simply inserting the recipient's email address. Recipients can redeem the gift in the Kindle Store to read on any Kindle or free Kindle app.

This is clearly a way to encourage and alert Amazon shoppers and the general public to the fact that they don't necessarily need a Kindle device to access Amazon's e-books and use their Kindle apps for e-book reading.

Read the full story at TechCrunch.

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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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