Scientists Find Playing Tetris Helps Treat PTSD Symptoms

Playing Tetris, one of the most popular video games of all time, could help reduce flashbacks for those who have been through traumatic experiences, according to a new experimental study published this week in the journal PLoS ONE. Laboratory work by a team of Oxford University scientists found that the game has a special ability not shared by other computer games.

'Our latest findings suggest Tetris is still effective as long as it is played within a critical six-hour window after viewing a stressful film,' said Dr Emily Holmes of Oxford University's Department of Psychiatry, who led the work. 'Whilst playing Tetris can reduce flashback-type memories without wiping out the ability to make sense of the event, we have shown that not all computer games have this beneficial effect -- some may even have a detrimental effect on how people deal with traumatic memories.'

Read the full story at ScienceDaily.

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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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