Holographic Videoconferencing: Just a Few Years Away?

If CNN can beam in reporters to comment on elections in its studio, why can't you talk to your boss or girlfriend's holographic image when she's hundreds of miles away? A few reasons. First of all, CNN's "hologram" wasn't really a hologram. Second, the system for transmitting light and reconstructing your girlfriend's three-dimensional image in front of your eyes turns out to be pretty expensive.

But a team of researchers at the University of Arizona are reportedly a few years away from bringing hologram technology to an office (or iPhone???) near you:

Researchers have made a major step toward a holographic videoconferencing system that would let people communicate with one another almost as if they were in the same room. They have developed a full-color, 3-D display that refreshes every two seconds, and they've used it to send live images of a researcher in California to collaborators in Arizona. In the coming years, the researchers hope to develop a system that refreshes at standard video rates and can compete with other 3-D displays.

Read the full story at Tech Review.

Presented by

Derek Thompson is a senior editor at The Atlantic, where he writes about economics, labor markets, and the entertainment business.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Photos of New York City, in Motion

A filmmaker animated hundreds of still photographs to create this Big Apple flip book

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open For 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

Video

What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

Science cannot fully explain near-death experiences.

More in Technology

Just In