Google Searches Show People (Still) Don't Know How to Vote

Nancy Scola points out that Google's top 20 searches this morning indicate that the logistics of voting are confusing. Fourteen of the top 20 queries are related to the election, mostly polling locations and registration questions.

I only point this out because people are only reading political coverage today we profiled a startup, TurboVote, that's trying to make voting easier. The hassle of voting seems sort of ludicrous in a time where you can execute far more complex operations with far less fuss.

Here's your top 20 searches this morning:

1. voting locations by zip code
2. where do i vote
3. polling locations
4. voting quotes
5. nc board of elections
6. vote 2010
7. demi lovato rehab
8. where am i registered to vote
9. election day 2010
10. massachusetts ballot questions 2010
11. amendment 4 florida
12. where can i vote
13. polling place
14. voting hours
15. ballroom dancing
16. coffee shops
17. yoga studios
18. league of women voters
19. voter registration
20. golf courses

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