Browse the Web With Your Bare Hands

The XBox 360 Kinect motion sensor took interactive gaming to a new level upon it's release. At the MIT Media Lab, the Fluid Interface group is looking to do for the keyboard and mouse what Kinect did for the gaming controller: get rid of it entirely. The team developed DepthJS, a software extension for Google Chrome that allows Javascript to talk to Microsoft's Kinect, allowing users to browse web pages by gesture alone.

Interactivity exhibited by the Kinect-Windows bridge is vaguely reminiscent of an earlier exploration into gestural technology, namely the more hands-on Microsoft Surface, which relied on the multi-touch technology we now, thanks to the iPad, consider commonplace.

Both multi-touch and motion capture technology have their pitfalls, but it'll be interesting to see how Microsoft might adapt both forms of user engagement into future products.

H/t Engadget.
Presented by

Jared Keller is a journalist based in New York. He has written for Bloomberg Businessweek, Pacific Standard, and Al Jazeera America, and is a former associate editor for The Atlantic.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Confessions of Moms Around the World

A global look at the hardest and best job ever

Video

A Stop-Motion Tour of New York City

A filmmaker animated hundreds of still photographs to create this Big Apple flip book

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open for 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

More in Technology

Just In