WikiLeaks: Our Funding Account Has Been Blocked

The renegade secret document repository, WikiLeaks, says that its funds have been cut off.

The British company that accepted donations for WikiLeaks has, apparently, shut down the organization's account after encountering problems with western governments, the Guardian reports.

The whistleblowing group WikiLeaks claims that it has had its funding blocked and that it is the victim of financial warfare by the US government.

Moneybookers, a British-registered internet payment company that collects WikiLeaks donations, emailed the organisation to say it had closed down its account because it had been put on an official US watchlist and on an Australian government blacklist.

The apparent blacklisting came a few days after the Pentagon publicly expressed its anger at WikiLeaks and its founder, Australian citizen Julian Assange, for obtaining thousands of classified military documents about the war in Afghanistan, in one of the US army's biggest leaks of information. The documents caused a sensation when they were made available to the Guardian, the New York Times and German magazine Der Spiegel, revealing hitherto unreported civilian casualties. WikiLeaks defied Pentagon calls to return the war logs and destroy all copies.

Instead, it has been reported that it intends to release an even larger cache of military documents, disclosing other abuses in Iraq. Moneybookers moved against WikiLeaks on 13 August, according to the correspondence, less than a week after the Pentagon made public threats of reprisals against the organisation.

Read the full story at Guardian (UK).

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