Verizon Accidentally Charged Customers $90 Million Too Much

Mobile giant Verizon appears to have systematically, although purportedly unintentionally, overcharged customers for data usage on their cell phones. According to the company, "the majority of the data sessions involved minor data exchanges caused by software built into their phones; others involved accessing the web, which should not have incurred charges." 15 million customers were hit with the small extra fees. Perhaps not a big deal, but it makes you wonder: how often does this happen and we *don't* hear about it.

This may well be the largest consumer telecommunications refund in history. Verizon Wireless said Sunday it will pay up to $90 million in refunds to some 15 million subscribers who were charged for data usage or Internet access though they weren't on data usage plans. The company will credit current customers who were billed for bogus data sessions between $2 and $6 each on their October and November bills. And it will cut checks in the same amounts to former customers.

Read the full story at All Things D.

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