Picture of the Day: Geometric Death Frequency-141

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Assembled by robots, Geometric Death Frequency-141 was unveiled to the public a few days ago at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art. It will remain on display through March 2012 along with one of the robots integral to its construction.

Designed by Federica Diaz, a Prague-based artist, the site-specific sculpture is 50 feet long and 20 feet tall, filling the entrance courtyard of the MoCA building. It was built using 420,000 black balls meant to represent the pixels of a digital photograph.

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Images: Mass MoCA, via Co.Design.

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Nicholas Jackson is a former associate editor at The Atlantic.

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