Meet the First Autistic Presidential Appointee

Ari Ne'eman, the first autistic Presidential appointee, sat down with one of our favorite science writers, Steve Silberman, to talk about his political role and his brain. It's not your average interview as Silberman and Ne'eman explore how to deal with the reality of "neurodiversity." It makes great companion reading with our October magazine story, "Autism's First Child."

Ne'eman's deliberate use of the phrase "the autistic community" was more subversive than it sounds. The notion that autistic people -- often portrayed in the media as pitiable loners -- would not only wear their diagnosis proudly, but want to make common cause with other autistic people, is still a radical one. Imagine a world in which most public discussion of homosexuality was devoted to finding a cure for it, rather than on the need to address the social injustices that prevent gay people from living happier lives. Though the metaphor is far from exact (for example, gay people obviously don't face the impairments that many autistic people do), that's the kind of world that autistic people live in.

Now, as the first openly autistic White House appointee in history -- and one of the youngest at age 22 -- Ne'eman is determined to change that. In December, he was nominated by President Obama to the National Council on Disability (NCD), a panel that advises the President and Congress on ways of reforming health care, schools, support services and employment policy to make society more equitable for people with all forms of disability.

Ne'eman spoke to Wired.com in July in his first interview with the media since his appointment.

Read the full story at Wired Science at Wired.

Presented by

Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Before Tinder, a Tree

Looking for your soulmate? Write a letter to the "Bridegroom's Oak" in Germany.

Video

The Health Benefits of Going Outside

People spend too much time indoors. One solution: ecotherapy.

Video

Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

Why did Green Bank, West Virginia, ban wireless signals? For science.

Video

Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

Video

Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

More in Technology

Just In