Margaret Atwood Draws Comics for Two Lucky Twitter Users

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Some celebrities are awesome. Take the science fictiony writer Margaret Atwood. Two of her fans, @DrSnit and @kidney_boy, were talking about her books on Twitter one day. She noticed and retweeted them, and then something about the combination of names made her take a special interest.

She imagined the two as superheroes and wrote to them saying, "I'd like to design your Kidney Boy and Dr. Snit superhero comix costumes." A month went by and then out of the Twitter blue, came the two hilarious drawings you see here. @Kidney_Boy, aka Joel Topf, MD, a nephrologist in Detroit, related the whole experience today on his blog, Precious Bodily Fluids.

All of which proves that Atwood, who wrote about her Twitter experience for the New York Review of Books, is at the top of the Twitter celebrity game.

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Alexis C. Madrigal

Alexis Madrigal is the deputy editor of TheAtlantic.com, where he also oversees the Technology Channel. He's the author of Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology. More

The New York Observer has called Madrigal "for all intents and purposes, the perfect modern reporter." He co-founded Longshot magazine, a high-speed media experiment that garnered attention from The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and the BBC. While at Wired.com, he built Wired Science into one of the most popular blogs in the world. The site was nominated for best magazine blog by the MPA and best science Web site in the 2009 Webby Awards. He also co-founded Haiti ReWired, a groundbreaking community dedicated to the discussion of technology, infrastructure, and the future of Haiti.

He's spoken at Stanford, CalTech, Berkeley, SXSW, E3, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and his writing was anthologized in Best Technology Writing 2010 (Yale University Press).

Madrigal is a visiting scholar at the University of California at Berkeley's Office for the History of Science and Technology. Born in Mexico City, he grew up in the exurbs north of Portland, Oregon, and now lives in Oakland.

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