Video: Climbing to the Top of a 1,768-Foot TV Transmission Tower

It's really easy to take the infrastructure of television and radio for granted. They're old technologies; most innovation activity has moved to other sectors. But what we forget is that the system has to be maintained. Things break. Replacement parts have to be made and installed. Storms deliver damage. This video is perhaps the most dramatic visualization of the importance of operations and maintenance that you're ever likely to see. In it, a technician climbs to the top of a tower more than 1,700 feet tall. Most of the time he's not using a rope (which is allowed by safety regulations) and he's dragging a huge bag of tools as he goes up, up, up. You should definitely watch the video. Go all the way to the end. If you're even a little bit afraid of heights, you'll get the emotional fear response that we need to stimulate people into maintaining and rebuilding the country's infrastructure. Last time the nation's engineers told us about the hazardous state of our dams, bridges, roads, levees and pipelines, few listened. Maybe in its own weird way, this video can help us remember that we can't take the things we built in the 20th century for granted.

[via Boing Boing]

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