I Am a Cyborg and I Want My Google Implant Already

cyborg.jpg

About nine months ago, I sat in a conference room at Google Headquarters in Mountain View with my boss, Nate Silver, and the company's Chief Economist, Hal Varian, talking about the Google of 2020.

The previous night, Nate and I had been hanging out with one of my childhood friends in downtown San Francisco, brainstorming questions to ask Hal in our interview the following day.

I'd been working with Nate as his research assistant on a book project that examines forecasting and prediction in a variety of different fields. Going off on a tangent, we conceived of the concept of a Google Singularity -- an event where the amount of information known by Google surpasses the amount of information it's possible to know. I laughed as Nate drew a graph on a piece of my friend's Hello Kitty stationary illustrating the theoretical point where this event would occur.

The 50th Anniversary of the Cyborg

This is one of 50 posts about cyborgs, a project coordinated by occasional Tech Channel contributor, Tim Maly, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the coining of the term.

In the interview the following day, after a good 45 minutes of serious discussion about Google's search algorithms and new projects going on in the company, Nate brought up the Google Singularity. Hal got a kick out of this concept, and we mused about the things the future of Google might produce, one such thing being a "Google implant" that would allow one to browse the Web simply by thinking.

Nate: What will Google look like in 2020?
Hal: Now you Google things on your computer -- of course. And you Google things on your phone. That's the next stage. And I believe -- people may laugh -- but I think there will be an implant. So you'll have it there, and I won't say it's necessarily Google, I'll say the Web, it will access the Web of information.
Arikia: Sign me up when that happens.
Hal: You want your implant?
Arikia: I want it now.
 [laughter]
Hal: Yeah! Right, see? There are a lot of people that say that. I think you will be continuously connected to the Web in 2020. You'll be able to pull information in, information out, you'll be able to record information. And you can do all these things now; you're recording this conversation and you can play it back later.
Nate: Sure. But you think that soon, by 2020?
Hal: 2020! That's away 10 years! Look at where we are and look at where we were 10 years ago. Google's only 10 years old. So uh, yeah, I think so. We'll certainly have some kind of implant interface by then, in my opinion.
Nate: Will it require surgery? Or will it require some kind of earpiece that you can... I don't know...
Hal: I don't know either.
Nate: Are there people at the firm working on that?
Hal: Not that I know of. Although there are people always working on user interfaces, so I wouldn't be surprised if someone was thinking about it. There are people working on things that display text on your glasses.

After that, the conversation veered to topics like The Cloud, Steve Mann and real-time search. As Nate always does when an interview is wrapping up, he invited me to ask any questions I may have been sitting on. So I asked Hal: "Are you going to get the implant?"

Presented by

Arikia Millikan is a Brooklyn-based Web maven. She is a community manager at Wired.com and the research assistant to Nate Silver of FiveThirtyEight.

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