Apple Spells Out Rules for Developers

The process of getting an app into Apple's app store has always been a bit excruciating for developers. The unpredictability of the process seemed design to drive coders to astrological divination or some other sort of mysticism. This morning, though, the company delivered its registered developers some help in the form of a set of guidelines for the app store. Various sites have line-by-line roundups, but I liked Engadget's distillation:

All in all, there's nothing here we weren't really expecting, but it's nice to see Apple finally making these rules public -- and it's definitely refreshing to see the company address its developers with this sort of honest directness... devs have a better sense of what they can and can't do, and that's no small improvement. We'll see how these rules evolve over time -- we can already think of several edge cases, and Apple seems committed to being flexible and case-specific with the apps it allows.

Read the full story at Engadget.

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