Why Treaties Can't Stop Cyber Sabotage

Cyberattacks have become a growing concern this year, but international agreements aimed at curbing such threats are more bark than bite, Miller McCune's Michael Scott Moore argues.

Recommendations in Europe -- from The Economist, the U.N. and Russia -- involve nuclear-style arms treaties to manage the cyber-arms race now under way. These agreements would set rules for international response to cyber-attacks and authorize sanctions against nations that engage in them. But a treaty would be easy to cheat on and tough to enforce; a hacker who can set a logic bomb can also cover his tracks.

Read the full story at Miller McCune.

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Niraj Chokshi is a former staff editor at TheAtlantic.com, where he wrote about technology. He is currently freelancing and can be reached through his personal website, NirajC.com. More

Niraj previously reported on the business of the nation's largest law firms for The Recorder, a San Francisco legal newspaper. He has also been published in The Hartford Courant, The Seattle Times and The Age, in Melbourne, Australia. He's also a longtime programmer and sometimes website designer.

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