Tweet of the Day: 'The Problem With Cloud Apps ...'

We're all moving to "cloud apps," whether we know it or not. These services, like Gmail or Google Docs, are integral to the ways that we do business. We develop routines for working with them that are as finely honed as a tennis swing.

And then they go and change the racket.

Gmail, for example, recently changed where the "Compose" button was. I didn't mind, but the first few times I went to write an email, I felt like a gawky teenager tripping over my own feet.

Our own James Fallows pointed out a few months ago that cloud apps may be a source of problems that we don't fully recognize yet. Sure, cloud app developers can make things better with no effort from the user, but they can also make things worse without you knowing.

You log in to your application and bang: something has changed. Dylan Tweney, the editor of Wired's Gadget Lab blog, captured the pith of the situation with this tweet:

dylan20.jpg


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