How Weather Sites Prepare for Hurricane Season

Data Center Knowledge interviews the operators of three weather sites on what they do to prepare for hurricane-related traffic spikes. The piece is filled with interesting tidbits. For example, on February 9th (a.k.a. the Second North American Blizzard of 2010), The Weather Channel broke its single-day traffic record with 178 million page views. Crazy. The following is a snippet describing how Stormpulse operates:

Stormpulse is a fast-growing site known for its use of rich graphics and maps to provide detailed data on the path and strength of storms. With daily traffic ranging from tens of thousands to hundreds of thousands of visitors, uses cloud computing to serve up its site. Stormpulse is a customer of Amazon's EC2 and S3 services, according to co-founder Matthew Wensing.

"Our infrastructure is designed with spikes in mind," said Wensing. "All of our back-end computations (data collection, aggregation, and image-processing jobs) happen on separate servers from our customer-facing machines. We cache everything and use the best open-source caching software available.

Read the full story at Data Center Knowledge.

Presented by

Niraj Chokshi is a former staff editor at TheAtlantic.com, where he wrote about technology. He is currently freelancing and can be reached through his personal website, NirajC.com. More

Niraj previously reported on the business of the nation's largest law firms for The Recorder, a San Francisco legal newspaper. He has also been published in The Hartford Courant, The Seattle Times and The Age, in Melbourne, Australia. He's also a longtime programmer and sometimes website designer.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A Stop-Motion Tour of New York City

A filmmaker animated hundreds of still photographs to create this Big Apple flip book

Video

The Absurd Psychology of Restaurant Menus

Would people eat healthier if celery was called "cool celery?"

Video

This Japanese Inn Has Been Open For 1,300 Years

It's one of the oldest family businesses in the world.

Video

What Happens Inside a Dying Mind?

Science cannot fully explain near-death experiences.

More in Technology

Just In