Why the Bible Makes Such a Good App

After I posted on Bible apps for Apple devices, Chris Faraone, a Boston Phoenix staff writer, got in touch with me about a feature he wrote about e-Bibles back in February.

Faraone makes two terrific points about why Bibles work particularly well as apps. First, they have a 16-century-old reference system -- the old chapter and verse -- that makes switching between translations a snap. Second, many translations of the Bible are no longer protected by copyright, so all kinds of developers can work with free source material. Add it up, Faraone argues, and you've got the perfect vehicle for new media experimentation.

If you want to see what a 21st century reading experience should look like -- one that enables you to bookmark, notate, listen to, and share passages instantly on Facebook and Twitter -- the marketplace you're looking for is e-Bibles.

Read the full story at Boston Phoenix.

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