Where Congress Would Have Gone During a Cold War Nuclear Attack

The always-entertaining Atlas Obscura surfaces another wonderful pushpin on their very odd map. They've got a new post up describing the nuclear fallout shelter at the Greenbrier Resort where Congress would have conducted its business in a postapocalyptic scenario that (thankfully) never arose. Zach Frechette (@ztf on Twitter), editor of GOOD Magazine, spotted the link. Perhaps it was the hideously outdated and wonderful wallpaper our representatives would have had to endure that caught his eye.

The shelter was fully equipped and among its standard bunk-beds, TVs and furniture, which populate the "Graceland of Atomic Tourism," there are a few very curious items. Among these are a special room meant for holding and calming members of Congress who can't handle the stress, and an incinerator meant for "pathological waste," or the Congressmen's irradiated bodies. A huge 100-foot radio tower installed 4.5 miles away was connected to the bunker so that the congressmen could broadcast emergency messages.

Read the full story at Atlas Obscura.

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