Google Lets Anyone Create a Mobile Application

Google announced a new service today that aims to make writing programs for Android, its mobile operating system, easy for non-programmers. Wired's Eliot Van Buskirk uses the announcement to contrast Google and Apple's policies toward app development:

Google App Inventor for Android demonstrates how markedly Google's philosophy differs from Apple's, whose app model it copied to a great extent. Apple wants a velvet rope to keep subpar developers out, but Google just sent them an engraved invitation, potentially opening the floodgates for exactly the type of deluge of unsophisticated apps that Apple seems so eager to avoid.

...

That said, Google hasn't opened development to everybody as of today. Would-be app developers must register with a Gmail e-mail address if they wish to be considered for inclusion in the program.

Read the full story at Wired.

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Niraj Chokshi is a former staff editor at TheAtlantic.com, where he wrote about technology. He is currently freelancing and can be reached through his personal website, NirajC.com. More

Niraj previously reported on the business of the nation's largest law firms for The Recorder, a San Francisco legal newspaper. He has also been published in The Hartford Courant, The Seattle Times and The Age, in Melbourne, Australia. He's also a longtime programmer and sometimes website designer.

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