Consumer Reports Says Apple's iPhone 4 Has 'Design Defect'

The debate over the iPhone 4's alleged antenna problem has been fierce. Some customers are furious with Apple for making what they call a faulty product. Others say those customers are being unreasonable, making a big deal out of nothing or simply holding the phone in an unnatural way. Now Consumer Reports magazine, the well-regarded, trusted source on product reviews, has weighed in and said they won't recommend the phone until Apple permanently fixes what they call a "design defect," for free:

We reached this conclusion after testing all three of our iPhone 4s (purchased at three separate retailers in the New York area) in the controlled environment of CU's radio frequency (RF) isolation chamber. In this room, which is impervious to outside radio signals, our test engineers connected the phones to our base-station emulator, a device that simulates carrier cell towers (see video: IPhone 4 Design Defect Confirmed). We also tested several other AT&T phones the same way, including the iPhone 3G S and the Palm Pre. None of those phones had the signal-loss problems of the iPhone 4.

Read the full story at Consumer Reports.

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Niraj Chokshi is a former staff editor at TheAtlantic.com, where he wrote about technology. He is currently freelancing and can be reached through his personal website, NirajC.com. More

Niraj previously reported on the business of the nation's largest law firms for The Recorder, a San Francisco legal newspaper. He has also been published in The Hartford Courant, The Seattle Times and The Age, in Melbourne, Australia. He's also a longtime programmer and sometimes website designer.

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