The Democratic War on Science?

Shannen Coffin alleges that while in the Clinton White House, Elena Kagan somehow got the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists to change the language in its report on partial birth abortion, from a finding that it  "could identify no circumstances under which this procedure . . . would be the only option to save the life or preserve the health of the woman" to something which made the ban sound considerably more harmful.

I don't have a particular dog in this fight--I don't think these questions should be handled at the federal level either way--but it seems pretty inappropriate for the White House to be intervening in this sort of statement.  I'm not surprised the White House did it;  I never thought there was anything particularly partisan about attempts to manipulate science to fit a political narrative.  But I'm rather surprised that ACOG went along.

Presented by

Megan McArdle is a columnist at Bloomberg View and a former senior editor at The Atlantic. Her new book is The Up Side of Down.

Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her middle school. Then Humans of New York told her story to the Internet—and everything changed.

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register with Disqus.

Please note that The Atlantic's account system is separate from our commenting system. To log in or register with The Atlantic, use the Sign In button at the top of every page.

blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

Video

'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

Video

What Fifty Shades Left Out

A straightforward guide to BDSM

More in Technology

Just In