The iPad Pianist in All of Us

>Here's a little treat for anyone who has so far underestimated the potential of the iPad. Some of us were hoping Apple would call it the Slate, because it truly is a blank slate whose potential will only be limited by the ideas that people bring to it.


Pianist Lang Lang playing "Flight of the Bumblebee" on an iPad, Davies Symphony Hall, San Francisco CA April 19, 2010.

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David Shenk is a writer on genetics, talent and intelligence. He is the author of Data Smog, The Forgetting, and most recently, The Genius In All of Us. More

David Shenk is the author of six books, including Data Smog ("indispensable"—The New York Times), The Immortal Game ("superb"—The Wall Street Journal), and the bestselling The Forgetting ("a remarkable addition to the literature of the science of the mind."—The Los Angeles Times ). He has contributed to National Geographic, Slate, The New York Times, Gourmet, Harper's, The New Yorker, The American Scholar, and National Public Radio. Shenk's work inspired the Emmy-award winning PBS documentary The Forgetting and was featured in the Oscar-nominated feature Away From Her. His latest book, The Genius In All Of Us, was published in March 2010. Shenk has advised the President's Council on Bioethics and is a popular speaker. Click here to follow him on Twitter.

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