Behind the curve? Ahead of the curve? (updated)

Wall-sized billboard in United Concourse B, O'Hare airport, this evening:

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The ad didn't look as if it had been newly placed, as a épater-type challenge to conventional sensibilities. It was a little faded at the sides. But could it really have been left there unnoticed (by Accenture) all this time?

OTOH, the whole white-hotness of this scandal already seems like something from another time. We have Harry Reid Conan to think about!

More on Google-and-China, Copenhagen-and-China, America-and-decline, Nexus-and-iPhone, Duluth-and-beer, airlines-and-security, and other topics once I unpack (and sleep).

UPDATE: I have heard from readers who have seen this ad, and similar Accenture/Tiger ads, recently in other airports including LaGuardia, Atlanta, Houston, and Hong Kong. None of the ads seem to be newly installed; they're leftovers, with new meanings. From a reader who went through Chicago:

"The billboard of Tiger Woods at the water hazard has been dislpayed at O'Hare for at least a month.  I was through Concourse B on 11th December, which was the very day he admitted his various wrongdoings and issued the first of his public apologia along with his suspension of his professional golf career.  It was pretty funny to walk past countless TV monitors displaying his remarks (and interminable talking heads dissecting them) and then see that billboard.  I'm surprised it's still up."
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James Fallows is a national correspondent for The Atlantic and has written for the magazine since the late 1970s. He has reported extensively from outside the United States and once worked as President Carter's chief speechwriter. His latest book is China Airborne. More

James Fallows is based in Washington as a national correspondent for The Atlantic. He has worked for the magazine for nearly 30 years and in that time has also lived in Seattle, Berkeley, Austin, Tokyo, Kuala Lumpur, Shanghai, and Beijing. He was raised in Redlands, California, received his undergraduate degree in American history and literature from Harvard, and received a graduate degree in economics from Oxford as a Rhodes scholar. In addition to working for The Atlantic, he has spent two years as chief White House speechwriter for Jimmy Carter, two years as the editor of US News & World Report, and six months as a program designer at Microsoft. He is an instrument-rated private pilot. He is also now the chair in U.S. media at the U.S. Studies Centre at the University of Sydney, in Australia.

Fallows has been a finalist for the National Magazine Award five times and has won once; he has also won the American Book Award for nonfiction and a N.Y. Emmy award for the documentary series Doing Business in China. He was the founding chairman of the New America Foundation. His recent books Blind Into Baghdad (2006) and Postcards From Tomorrow Square (2009) are based on his writings for The Atlantic. His latest book is China Airborne. He is married to Deborah Fallows, author of the recent book Dreaming in Chinese. They have two married sons.

Fallows welcomes and frequently quotes from reader mail sent via the "Email" button below. Unless you specify otherwise, we consider any incoming mail available for possible quotation -- but not with the sender's real name unless you explicitly state that it may be used. If you are wondering why Fallows does not use a "Comments" field below his posts, please see previous explanations here and here.

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