New from The Atlantic: TheAtlanticCities.com. Because place matters.

The Future of the City

Best of the Atlantic Stories about cities from our first 150 years

Back to the Future

Back to the Future

Why aren't there monorails in numerous American cities? Wayne Curtis explored that question by visiting Las Vegas in 2005, shortly after Sin City opened its single-track effort at mass transit. More »

The Empty Arena

The Empty Arena

If Kansas City builds it, they might not come. More »

Seattle Mon Amour

Seattle Mon Amour

A dispatch from Seattle by Bernard-Henri Levi. More »

Houses of the Future

Houses of the Future

After Hurricane Katrina, a handful of small, independent developers began building new houses. "As with jazz, gumbo, and some remarkable cocktails, this style illustrates the city's talent for crafting extraordinary things from the ordinary stuff it has at hand," Wayne Curtis writes. More »

Scaling Alaska's Heights

Scaling Alaska's Heights

Descending from the mountain, a visitor to Juneau can walk all the way back to his or her downtown hotel in plenty of time to shower for the cocktail hour. But cleaning up isn't strictly necessary: the Alaskan capital is, after all, a frontier city. More »

A Tale of Two Townhouses

A Tale of Two Townhouses

Comparing housing prices in Los Angeles and Dallas, Virginia Postrel finds that Angelenos pay a premium for the right to build on their land. The result: houses that cost roughly $300,000 more than their equivalent in Texas. More »

The Genesis of the Gang

The Genesis of the Gang

In this 1899 piece, Jacob Riis, one of the most famed muckraking journalists in American history, explained how tenement living pushed urban youth toward lives of crime. More »

The Mad Strangler of Boston

The Mad Strangler of Boston

In 1964, Erle Stanley Gardner, creator of the Perry Mason series, weighed in on a puzzling crime. More »

How Portland Does It

How Portland Does It

On a 1992 trip to Portland, Oregon, Philip Langdon tries to discover how the "courteous, well-kept city of 453,000" became "a paragon of healthy urban development." More »

American Murder Mystery

American Murder Mystery

In an effort to fight poverty, officials in Memphis and many other American cities demolished big public housing projects. But dispersing the residents brought crime into formerly safe areas. More »

The Not-So-Second City

The Not-So-Second City

Chicago is the finest architectural city in the United States, Benjamin Schwarz writes. But the story includes a rueful note. More »

Reversing White Flight

Reversing White Flight

Even if vouchers don't improve schools, they will almost certainly improve neighborhoods More »

Los Angeles: The Anti-City

Los Angeles: The Anti-City

In 2005, Bernard-Henri Levi explained why L.A. was "the prototype of a city with a poorly developed language, the prototype of unintelligible, illegible discourse." More »

The Tiki Wars

The Tiki Wars

Wayne Curtis visits a Columbus, Ohio, supper club where thatched dining huts and an 80-foot-high tiki goddess spur him to ponder what kinds of buildings deserve preservation for posterity More »

New York After Paris

New York After Paris

A 1906 article wonders whether the capital of the New World will ever compare to the capital of France More »

The Mall of America

The Mall of America

An existential reflection on the modern shopping center More »

Are Cities Dead?

Are Cities Dead?

Robert Moses defends urban sprawl. (January 1962) More »

Boston Hymn

Boston Hymn

A poet and a city celebrate Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation. More »

Broken Windows

Broken Windows

This influential March 1982 piece has been credited with reversing the lengthy crime epidemic that plagued New York City. More »

The Florida Report - An 8-part video series with Richard Florida The Burden of Home Ownership

The Burden of Home Ownership

Part 8: Richard Florida argues that Americans need to get over their obsession with real estate More in the series »

The Path to Recovery

The Path to Recovery

The rise of megaregions, the decline of home ownership, the shift away from a car culture - these are among the nation's responses to today's economic turmoil. Adapted from Richard Florida's new book, The Great Reset. More »

High Speed Rail All Aboard!

The future of train travel, with The Atlantic's Derek Thompson