Photo credit Barbara Ries

In some ways, women have never had greater opportunities: They make up the majority of college graduates and now account for one-third of lawyers and doctors.

Despite these advances, the economic picture for women has never been more precarious. Women make up two-thirds of minimum wage workers, are increasingly acting as both primary breadwinners and primary caretakers, and on average still earn less than their male counterparts for performing the same work.

To explore these issues, The Atlantic is teaming up with Maria Shriver, who next week releases a year-long study on poverty among women. The Shriver Report: A Woman’s Nation Pushes Back from the Brink, published with the Center for American Progress, explores the political, social, and cultural reasons for America’s economic gender inequality -- and explains what can be done about it.


A Female Senator Explains Why Uptalk Is Part of Women's 'Nature' Reuters

A Female Senator Explains Why Uptalk Is Part of Women's 'Nature'

Yet Kirsten Gillibrand says women also need to learn that it's okay to be aggressive. 

Nancy Pelosi: Money in Politics Keeps Women Out of Office Reuters

Nancy Pelosi: Money in Politics Keeps Women Out of Office

The amount spent on negative political ads particularly hurts, she says.

Wealthy Women Can Afford to Reject Marriage, but Poor Women Can't Reuters

Wealthy Women Can Afford to Reject Marriage, but Poor Women Can't

Higher-income "single ladies" often push back against "patriarchy." But the statistics don't lie: Low-income, unmarried women face significant economic challenges when they stay single. 

Watch the Shriver Report on Women and Poverty Barbara Ries

Watch the Shriver Report on Women and Poverty

An Atlantic summit featuring Nancy Pelosi, Kirsten Gillibrand, Maria Shriver, and more. 

The Plight of Single Moms—and the Policies That Would Help Jan Sonnenmair

The Plight of Single Moms—and the Policies That Would Help

Low-income women and single mothers are more likely to live with financial stress and regret, but they're also more optimistic about their prospects.

It Is Expensive to Be Poor Barbara Ries

It Is Expensive to Be Poor

Minimum-wage jobs are physically demanding, have unpredictable schedules, and pay so meagerly that workers can't save up enough to move on.

Why American Women Aren't Living as Long as They Should Barbara Kinney

Why American Women Aren't Living as Long as They Should

New research shows that life expectancies for women in other first-world countries are rising faster than those of U.S. women. And the lives of poor women are even shorter.

The U.S. Economy Does Not Value Caregivers Barbara Ries

The U.S. Economy Does Not Value Caregivers

Providers of physical and spiritual care are just as indispensable to our society as providers of income. So why don't we treat them that way?

The Female Face of Poverty Barbara Kinney

The Female Face of Poverty

Fifty years after the War on Poverty began, millions of women are still struggling to get by.

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