'Let's Do Something Different': The End of the World's Leading 'Ex-Gay' Ministry

An interview with Exodus International president Alan Chambers, who just announced that the organization will shut down.
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"We're sorry."

The beginning of the end came with those two words, in a press release on Wednesday from Alan Chambers, the longtime leader of the world's most prominent "ex-gay" ministry. Since the 1970s, Exodus, in line with its conservative reading of the Bible, had taught that homosexuality was unholy and that through counseling and prayer, you could change your sexual orientation. But critics said that Exodus's core message--one of its longtime taglines was "change is possible"--and its embrace of "conversion" therapy did enormous emotional, spiritual and psychological damage, perpetuated outdated stereotypes and wholly wrong theories about the origins of homosexuality, and even led to countless suicides.

The breadth of Chambers's apology was unprecedented and startling (you can read the whole text here). For many people, though, it wasn't enough. Dan Savage, creator of the It Gets Better Project, tweeted, "Alan's work destroyed people. Sorry is nice, I guess, but it won't raise the dead." LGBT activist Daniel Gonzales added: "'Sorry' also requires you stop what you're doing that hurts people and is wrong. Exodus hasn't stopped.'"

A few hours later, on the first night of the organization's 38th annual conference, Chambers announced that Exodus would do just that: shut down and start something new. Shortly after he left the stage, he called me and we talked for 45 minutes about his journey to this place, making amends, and where he goes from here.


Where did the idea to close come from?

From the moment of my hiring, I've said that success for me would look like Exodus going out of business because the church was doing its job, whether that's helping people with a story like mine or people with a story like yours. I never thought in my lifetime that I would see this, and yet I did. About 18 months ago, we revisited this. There were four options we saw. One was to stay the same, which wasn't really an option. The second was to rebrand, which became not an option. The third was to modify Exodus, which is what we tried to do, and I think we did some good. The fourth was to shut down Exodus. For many, many months now, that's something I knew would happen. In my heart and mind, I've been clearly hearing God say it's time for this to be done. The good that could have been done is done.

When you say that, people are going hear that you think Exodus was successful, that you think it was a ministry that did good.

For some people, it was. Exodus saved my life. I was vulnerable and I had no other place to go. I didn't know what the gay community was or how to find it. Exodus was a place that rescued me. It was a safe haven for this little kid of faith who needed an option. While there is undeniable trauma that has happened for some, the fact of the matter is, for others it has not been traumatic. That will always be part of the story.

Do you get why so many people are still so angry at Exodus?

Yes. It's been traumatic for many people. It's been horrific. And it's not just Exodus. It's the church. It's a religious system that has taught us how to be contrary to the heart of Christ, to treat people who are sinners in ways that God himself wouldn't ever treat them. He sent Jesus. He loves us. He wants amazing things for us, and he wouldn't treat us in the ways that religion has taught us to treat people. I hear and understand why people are hurting and why they are in pain.

What parts of Exodus's teaching do you renounce?

What I renounce: the whole gay-to-straight process. That the goal is changing your sexual orientation, which we realized isn't something that happens. That that's what makes you acceptable to God. And that gay people couldn't ever be acceptable to God.

So what changed for you that got you to this place?

Realizing that the deepest part of the Exodus narrative is really a religious church narrative has been the biggest change. We are a church that has mostly been about waging war and battle. But I believe God has called us to be a people of peace. I've realized he can love a gay person or a lesbian person the same as anyone. For me as a Christian, those aren't boundaries or barriers, and I don't believe they are barriers for God. We felt it was absolutely necessary to close the ministry of Exodus and do what people who have been hurt are asking us to do: make amends in a way that makes a difference.

What do you say to people who have been through Exodus, who are still angry, who say that your apologies will never be enough?

All I can do is to say I'm sorry and I'm trying to do better. I realize there will be people who won't forgive. I hope in time there will be resolution for people who don't feel resolution today. I pray that people will find peace. I realize there have been people who have been hurt on their journey, and all I can say is I'm sorry and pledge to do differently.

Was there a single epiphany for you?

We'd all like those lightning-bolt experiences, but I don't know that I had one. As I've pursued my relationship with Christ and understood through my own story who God is in my life and how he loves and accepts me, it's just been a gradual process. Little by little something would change, or a word would change, or a belief or a thought. It's been over the last three years or so, since I taped my first interview with Lisa Ling. There was a controversy when I said gay people can go to heaven.

You've done tons of interviews over the years. What was it about that one?

I don't know that she asked something I hadn't been asked before or that I answered it in a way I hadn't. I've been saying controversial things here and there, but people tuned in with different ears. It became a catalyst. Once the horse was out of the gate, it wouldn't stop and I realized I didn't want it to stop.

What else has been influential to you recently? Stuff you've been reading?

A book that's made an enormous difference over the last month is The World Is Not Ours to Save, by Tyler Wigg-Stevenson, the founder of an organization called the Two Futures Project. He's a peace activist, and his goal is to end nuclear weapons. As I read what he's written, I realized it so parallels where we are in the church with the culture wars. We have armed ourselves to fight and battle people. That's not the heart of Christ.

And the Bible? What have you been reading and thinking about?

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