Robin Fields/ProPublica

  • “God Help You. You're on Dialysis.”

    Every year, more than 100,000 Americans start dialysis. One in four of them will die within 12 months—a fatality rate that is one of the worst in the industrialized world. Oh, and dialysis arguably costs more here than anywhere else. Although taxpayers cover most of the bill, the government has kept confidential clinic data that could help patients make better decisions. How did our first foray into near-universal coverage, begun four decades ago with such great hope, turn out this way? And what lessons does it hold for the future of health-care reform?

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The Health Benefits of Going Outside

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Where High Tech Meets the 1950s

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Yes, Quidditch Is Real

How J.K. Rowling's magical sport spread from Hogwarts to college campuses

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Would You Live in a Treehouse?

A treehouse can be an ideal office space, vacation rental, and way of reconnecting with your youth.

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