Robert D. Kaplan

Robert D. Kaplan is the author of Asia’s Cauldron: The South China Sea and the End of a Stable Pacific. He is the chief geopolitical analyst for Stratfor, and a national correspondent for The Atlantic. 

  • Supremacy by Stealth

    It is a cliché these days to observe that the United States now possesses a global empire—different from Britain's and Rome's but an empire nonetheless. It is time to move beyond a statement of the obvious. Our recent effort in Iraq, with its large-scale mobilization of troops and immense concentration of risk, is not indicative of how we will want to act in the future. So how should we operate on a tactical level to manage an unruly world? What are the rules and what are the tools?

  • Euphorias of Hatred

    The grim lessons of a novel by Gogol

  • A Tale of Two Colonies

    Our correspondent travels to Yemen and Eritrea, and finds that the war on terrorism is forcing U.S. involvement with the one country's tribal turbulence and the other's obsessive fear of chaos

  • A Post-Saddam Scenario

    Iraq could become America's primary staging ground in the Middle East. And the greatest beneficial effect could come next door, in Iran

  • The World in 2005

    Hidden in plain sight

  • Looking the World in the Eye

    Samuel Huntington is a mild-mannered man whose sharp opinions—about the collision of Islam and the West, about the role of the military in a liberal society, about what separates countries that work from countries that don't—have proved to be as prescient as they have been controversial. Huntington has been ridiculed and vilified, but in the decades ahead his view of the world will be the way it really looks

  • Roman Africa

    The economic and political fault lines that separated Carthage and Numidia are the ones that separate Tunisia and Algeria—and the Romans drew them

  • Where Europe Vanishes

    Civilizations have collided in the Caucasus Mountains since the dawn of history, and the region's dozens of ethnic groups have been noted for "obstinacy and ferocity" since ancient times. Stalin was born in these mountains, and it was also here that the Soviet empire began to crumble. The story of the Republic of Georgia illustrates that the peoples of the Caucasus may prove as incapable of self-rule as they were resistant to rule by outsiders

  • The Lawless Frontier

    The tribal lands of the Afghanistan-Pakistan border reveal the future of conflict in the Subcontinent, along with the dark side of globalization

  • The Return of Ancient Times

    Why the warrior politics of the twenty-first century will demand a pagan ethos

  • What Makes History

    The lessons of a New England landscape

  • Israel Now

    The author, a former resident of Israel, finds that raw power and economic forces are redrawing the map of the Middle East, and peace talks will merely formalize the emerging reality

  • Four-Star Generalists

    Military history pierces the philosophical fog that often surrounds the other humanities.

  • China: A World Power Again

    What is usual for China is unusual for the West -- at least in recent memory

  • Kissinger, Metternich, and Realism

    Henry Kissinger's first book, on the Napoleonic Wars, explains Kissinger's foreign policy better than any of his memoirs, and is striking as an early display of brilliance and authority

  • Hoods Against Democrats

    In Bulgaria the distinction between the state and organized crime is clear -- for now

  • The Fulcrum of Europe

    Romania longs for the West, and the West needs Romania more than it knows

  • Travels into America's Future

    Imagine a land in which the dominant culture is an internationalized one, at every level; in which the political units that really matter are confederations of city-states; in which loyalty is an economic concept, when it is not obsolete; in which "the United States" exists chiefly to provide military protection. That is the land our correspondent glimpses, and it is no longer beyond the horizon

  • Special Intelligence

    The roles of the CIA and the military may merge, in the form of "Special Forces," made up of data-analyzing urban commandos

  • Was Democracy Just a Moment?

    The global triumph of democracy was to be the glorious climax of the American Century. But democracy may not be the system that will best serve the world—or even the one that will prevail in places that now consider themselves bastions of freedom.

VIdeo

Life as an Obama Impersonator

"When you think you're the president, you just act like you are above everybody else."

Video

Things Not to Say to a Pregnant Woman

You don't have to tell her how big she is. You don't need to touch her belly.

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Maine's Underground Street Art

"Graffiti is the farthest thing from anarchy."

Video

The Joy of Running in a Beautiful Place

A love letter to California's Marin Headlands

Video

'I Didn't Even Know What I Was Going Through'

A 17-year-old describes his struggles with depression.

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