Randolph S. Bourne

  • Trans-national America

    As World War I unfolded in Europe, intensifying ethnic antagonisms, native-born Americans became increasingly suspicious of the pockets of immigrant culture thriving among them. In 1916, critic and essayist Randolph Bourne challenged such attitudes with an essay—now considered a classic of forward thinking—calling for a new, more cosmopolitan conception of America and a reconsideration of the "melting-pot" theory

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A Miniature 1950s Utopia

A reclusive artist built this idealized suburb to grapple with his painful childhood memories.

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Why Principals Matter

Nadia Lopez didn't think anybody cared about her school. Then the Internet heard her story.

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A History of Contraception

In the 16th century, men used linen condoms laced shut with ribbons.

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'A Music That Has No End'

In Spain, a flamenco guitarist hustles to make a modest living.

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