Ralph Waldo Emerson

  • American Civilization
    Corbis

    American Civilization

    One year after the start of the Civil War, Emerson, a co-founder of The Atlantic, issued a vehement call to free the slaves—predicting that the world would take notice of the statesman with the courage to “break through the cobwebs” of fear and do so. Within a year, President Lincoln would issue the Emancipation Proclamation.

  • Voluntaries

    A poem in praise of soldiers who gave up their lives for the Union

  • American Civilization

    American Civilization

    An Atlantic founder argues vehemently for the emancipation of the slaves.

  • The President’s Proclamation

    The President’s Proclamation

    Seven months after his call to free the slaves, Emerson hails the Emancipation Proclamation.

  • Voluntaries

    Emerson pays poetic tribute to the Union's military volunteers

  • Country Life

    "Country Life" was the opening lecture of a course given by Mr. Emerson at the Freeman Place Chapel in Boston, in March, 1858. It was followed by "Works and Days" (printed in Society and Solitude), "Powers of the Mind," "Natural Method of Mental Philosophy," "Memory" (the matter of these three mostly now found in Natural History of Intellect), and "Self Possession." "Concord Walks," which will be printed in connection with "Country Life" in the last volume of the Centenary Edition of Mr. Emerson's works, was originally a part of the lecture, as given by him to his neighbors in the village Lyceum.—Edward W. Emerson

  • Boston Hymn

    The word of the Lord by night. To the watching Pilgrims came, As they sat by the sea-side, And filled their hearts with flame. God said,—I am…

  • The President's Proclamation

    Ralph Waldo Emerson hails Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation

  • Thoreau

    "The country knows not yet, or in the least part, how great a son it has lost."

  • American Civilization

    As the Civil War ground on, and the fate of the young nation hung in the balance, Ralph Waldo Emerson argued vehemently for a federal emancipation of the slaves. "Morality," above all else, he asserted, "is the object of government." He lauded President Lincoln for his principled moves in that direction.

  • Solitude and Society

    I fell in with a humorist, on my travels, who had in his chamber a cast of the Rondanini Medusa, and who assured me that the name which that fine…

  • Four Poems

    Brahma. If the red slayer think he slays, Or if the slain think he is slain, They know not well the subtle ways. I keep, and pass, and turn…

  • Illusions

    Some years ago, in company with an agreeable party, I spent a long summer day in exploring the Mammoth Cave in Kentucky. We traversed, through…

Video

Google Street View, Transformed Into a Tiny Planet

A 360-degree tour of our world, made entirely from Google's panoramas

Video

The 86-Year-Old Farmer Who Won't Quit

A filmmaker returns to his hometown to profile the patriarch of a family farm

Video

Riding Unicycles in a Cave

"If you fall down and break your leg, there's no way out."

Video

Carrot: A Pitch-Perfect Satire of Tech

"It's not just a vegetable. It's what a vegetable should be."

Video

The Benefits of Living Alone on a Mountain

"You really have to love solitary time by yourself."

Writers

Up
Down

Just In