Advice for J Street

By Jeffrey Goldberg

From Natasha Mozgovaya, the Ha'aretz correspondent in Washington:

J Street needs to make a clear decision - if they want to be truly inclusive, as they claim to be - they shouldn't be afraid to be so, despite the price they may have to pay. By continuing their current modus operandi - trying to dodge controversy - they are actually creating more controversies and might lose credibility even among their left-wing supporters. If they want to become a unique voice, they should say: "We do not agree, but we listen to all voices - and not under the table."

Also, as Mozgovaya suggests, J Street should stop lying to reporters. Jeremy Ben-Ami, the president of J Street, is spinning madly these days, trying to convince his supporters that this scandal is the product of a right-wing conspiracy. It is not -- the scandal flows from a series of decisions made by J Street to cover-up facts it deemed unpalatable. Let me put this another way: If it were discovered today that AIPAC, J Street's nemesis, received more than $800,000 from a Hong Kong-based "business associate" -- Ben-Ami's words -- of a prominent horse bettor, the people at AIPAC would be undergoing, by tomorrow, a journalistic colonoscopy like they've never experienced.


This article available online at:

http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2010/10/advice-for-j-street/63978/