The Victimology of Hillary Clinton

Even though her 2008 campaign took advantage of racially charged attacks on Barack Obama, she still think she's the one who had it tough.
Jim Bourg/Reuters

Earlier this week, Hillary Clinton sat down for an interview with Christiane Amanpour. Amanpour tossed the presumptive 2016 Democratic presidential nominee a question that may have been intended as a softball. It turned out to be a hand grenade:

“Senator Jay Rockefeller said recently and he suggested basically that some of the political opposition to President Obama could have something to do with the color of his skin. Do you agree with that? What do you think about that?”

Clinton’s fast-working mind immediately perceived the danger. She herself had benefited from—some might say used—racially based opposition to Barack Obama in the 2008 Democratic primaries. Here she is speaking to USA Today on May 8, 2008, the day after she lost the North Carolina primary:

"I have a much broader base to build a winning coalition on," she said in an interview with USA TODAY. As evidence, Clinton cited an Associated Press article "that found how Sen. Obama's support among working, hard-working Americans, white Americans, is weakening again, and how whites in both states who had not completed college were supporting me."

"There's a pattern emerging here," she said.

The better Obama did in the Democratic race overall, the more strongly white Democrats rallied to Clinton, sometimes by margins greater than 60 percent.

Almost to the very end of the race, Clinton looked to racial politics to swing the 800-plus Democratic superdelegates to her. On April 30, the week before the Indiana and North Carolina primaries, she gave an interview to Fox News’s Bill O’Reilly. He asked about the Reverend Jeremiah Wright, whose controversial “God damn America” remarks had just erupted into the news. Clinton said, “I’m going to leave it up to voters … but I wouldn’t have stayed in that church. I take offense at it. I think it’s offensive and outrageous, and I’m going to express my opinion. Others can express theirs.” (Clinton went on to win more than 60 percent of white Democrats in Indiana.)

In their detailed campaign book Game Change, Mark Halperin and John Heilemann reported that Clinton was “obsessed” (their word) with rumors of a videotape of Michelle Obama denouncing “whitey” in a sermon at Wright’s church. Reporters who covered that campaign had that story repeatedly shopped to them by a high-level Clinton aide.

In their minds, members of the Clinton team surely never thought of themselves as inciting racial divisions. They believed they were merely anticipating Republican incitement. In the face of impending right-wing racism, what choice did liberals have but to rally around the white candidate, in pure self-defense? (I heard this argument myself from a famous movie director and generous Clinton donor at a dinner party in 2008.) It was a highly convenient self-exculpatory argument. I’m not myself suggesting that Barack Obama is an alien with no right to sit in Washington’s chair … but other people will think so, and so what choice do I have but to urge the media to work harder to find a tape of Obama’s wife denouncing white people?

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David Frum is a senior editor at The Atlantic.

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