Every Stop and Frisk in NYC in 2012, in 2 Charts

What an unconstitutional police policy looks like on the ground
More

Where did black and Hispanic New Yorkers get their Fourth Amendment rights violated last year?

A new set of maps compiled by a Columbia University journalism school class and tweeted out by Belgian Fulbright student Damien Spleeters provide a disturbing visualization of the full extent of the controversial New York Police Department program, which spanned the length and breadth of New York.

Using geolocation data from the New York Civil Liberties Union provided by Professor Mark Hansen, the students were able map each of the 532,911 police stops, many of which resulted in frisks, under the program in 2012. The major reason for stopping people under the program, according to the NYCLU data, was "furtive movements."

Each of the black dots below represents a stop. As you can see, certain Brooklyn and Bronx neighborhoods saw more stops than others. East New York, Brownsville and Bed-Stuy were among the top neighborhoods for stops in Brooklyn, and Mott Haven was tops in the Bronx. Areas that saw the fewest stops included Central Park, Kipps Bay, Murray Hill, and Turtle Bay in Manhattan, and Greenpoint in Brooklyn.

BSEkLuGCEAA9LU1.png

The second graphic shows the same data, broken down by race. BSElo_ACUAIDQjl.png The key to reading those dots:

  • black: blue
  • black Hispanic: black
  • white Hispanic: orange
  • white: red
  • Asian/Pacific Islander: green
  • American Indian/Native Alaskan: yellow

While the program disproportionately targeted black and Hispanic New Yorkers, it also rolled up white people in Manhattan, South Brooklyn, and Staten Island. But it was mainly black and Hispanic New Yorkers who were targets. Per the NYCLU: "Of the 532,911 stops last year, 284,229 (54.8 percent) were of black people, and 165,140 (31.8 percent) were of Latinos. Conversely, whites accounted for only 50,366 (9.7 percent) of the stops."

(h/t The Verge)

Jump to comments
Presented by

Garance Franke-Ruta is a former senior editor covering national politics at The Atlantic.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.

Video

What Makes a Story Great?

The storytellers behind House of CardsandThis American Life reflect on the creative process.

Video

Tracing Sriracha's Origin to Thailand

Ever wonder how the wildly popular hot sauce got its name? It all started in Si Racha.

Video

Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in Politics

Just In