The White House Project Shutters Its Doors

More

A group founded in 1998 to promote women in politics and help one win the presidency quietly folds, citing the fundraising environment.

Screen shot 2013-01-28 at 9.39.24 AM.png

Updated 1:10 p.m. "We are sorry to inform you that due to the challenging economic climate The White House Project has had to close its doors," the message on the White House Project website read. And with that, a group that since 1998 has been a prominent voice on behalf of the goal of putting a woman in highest office in the land, as well as many of the lower ones, came to a quiet end on Monday.

"What happened is what's happening around other women's organizations and and other nonprofits.... The math doesn't work after a while," explained White House Project founder Marie Wilson, who gave up the presidency of her group two years ago and is currently working on a book project about "how we need to shift our structures and strategies to keep up with the times."

"I didn't exactly expect to start with my own," she observed. During its 14 years, the group changed how other organizations did business, how women in politics were represented in the popular culture and media, and the number of women who got trained in how to run for office, she said. "We did launch a conversation about the presidency that was unheard of," she added.

"[O]ur work will continue as it transitions to other organizations," the group's outgoing president, Tiffany Dufu, said in an online statement pointing to the Levo League and noting that "Vote Run Lead is being launched as a new organization to continue the political leadership training" previously provided by the White House Project.

The Levo League is a "startup designed to elevate young women in the workforce by providing the career resources needed to achieve personal and professional success," mainly focused on Gen Y women and those just starting their careers. Vote Run Lead describes itself as "the country's largest nonpartisan civic and political training program," and worked in close partnership with the White House Project for the past decade to train women considering in pursuing political careers.

Jump to comments
Presented by

Garance Franke-Ruta is a former senior editor covering national politics at The Atlantic.

Get Today's Top Stories in Your Inbox (preview)

What's the Number One Thing We Could Do to Improve City Life?

A group of journalists, professors, and non-profit leaders predict the future of livable, walkable cities


Elsewhere on the web

Join the Discussion

After you comment, click Post. If you’re not already logged in you will be asked to log in or register. blog comments powered by Disqus

Video

Adventures in Legal Weed

Colorado is now well into its first year as the first state to legalize recreational marijuana. How's it going? James Hamblin visits Aspen.

Video

What Makes a Story Great?

The storytellers behind House of CardsandThis American Life reflect on the creative process.

Video

Tracing Sriracha's Origin to Thailand

Ever wonder how the wildly popular hot sauce got its name? It all started in Si Racha.

Video

Where Confiscated Wildlife Ends Up

A government facility outside of Denver houses more than a million products of the illegal wildlife trade, from tigers and bears to bald eagles.

Video

Is Wine Healthy?

James Hamblin prepares to impress his date with knowledge about the health benefits of wine.

Video

The World's Largest Balloon Festival

Nine days, more than 700 balloons, and a whole lot of hot air

Writers

Up
Down

More in Politics

Just In